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Entries in Korg (15)

Jaw-dropping Daft Punk cover using the KORG iMS-20 app

This epic cover of Daft Punk's 'Derezzed' from the Tron: Legacy soundtrack shows how flexible the KORG iMS-20 app is. Call us old school if you like, but there are parts of this cover that actually sound better than the original. The game has changed!

Another classic covered by the KORG iMS-20 app can be found here.

If you have created something that you'd like us to share with the iPad Creative community, please feel free to drop us a line.

Video Find: iPad as a Music Studio

Can an iPad replace a laptop as a Music Studio? Here is someone who thinks you can.

In this video, recorded on an iPhone, Andrew Turner (deepliferecords on YouTube) discusses replacing his failed two year old HP Tablet with an iPad and a bunch of apps plus hardware add-ons, as a music creation device.

Andrew demos IK Multimedia's Amplitube for iPad and the iRig hardware interface along with NLogSynth PRO and a Korg nanoKEY midi controller plugged in via Apple's Camera Connection Kit. He is certainly impressed and at the end of the video he says:

"Overall, I'm very happy with the iPad as a replacement for my laptop... there's nothing that I can't do so far with the iPad that I could do with the Windows Notebook or a Windows Computer." 

We tend to agree with Andrew, but what do you think? Can an iPad replace a laptop for music creation? Let us know in the comments. 

KORG iMS-20. Prepare to be amazed!

Flabbergasting! That is the only word we can use to describe how astonishing KORG iMS-20 truly is. As a steady stream of iPad apps drifts past our field of view we are often amazed and surprised, but only occasionally are we flabbergasted.

KORG iMS-20 is a complete recreation of the KORG MS-20 analogue synth. It contains just about everything you need to create impressive tunes; sequencer, drum machine, mixer and pads, it's all here. Sharing your iMS-20 music could not be easier with the app's near perfect implementation of the SoundCloud network.

For those not entirely up to speed on analogue synths, the original Korg MS-20 has been used extensively by artists such as The Prodigy, William Orbit, Portishead, Jean-Michel Jarre and Daft Punk. Make no mistake, this is a serious piece of music making code and its arrival on the iPad is a watershed moment for iPad creativity. At its introductory price of just £9.49 (under $20) it's also a bargain.

As I write this the KORG iMS-20 app holds the number one spot on both the US and UK 'Paid Apps' charts, eclipsing Angry Birds, Cut the Rope and even Apple's own Pages. Clearly quality is rewarded on the App Store.

KORG iMS-20 isn't for everyone, but if you have any kind of interest in making music with your iPad you need this app, there is nothing quite like it on the iPad or on any other platform for that matter.

YouTube video demonstration by Bullerbyne.

iELECTRIBE update adds much requested export options

We wrote about Korg's fantastic iELECTRIBE a few weeks ago and although we loved it, our only real criticism was the lack of export options, meaning that your beat creations were stuck on the device and couldn't be shared easily.

Well, just yesterday one of our favourite portable music creation blogs Palm Sounds gave us the heads-up on an update to iELECTRIBE which addresses the export issue. Korg has now added several export options including exporting a beat loop to your Mac or PC via the iPad file management interface in iTunes. This means it is ready for use in your desktop DAW, or you can solo a part from your track and export just that to your computer. You can also record a live performance and import via iTunes the same way.

From the Korg website:

iELECTRIBE Version 1.1.0 is now available! This update adds the ability to transfer audio from the iELECTRIBE app into a MAC or PC via iTunes, using CD quality wav files. This feature ultimately allows you to use iELECTRIBE patterns and performances in your DAW or video editing software. Current iELECTRIBE owners can update for free.

It is an impressive update and answers nicely the requests from users for an export option. The video below shows the export options in operation, they look great and very straightforward to use. We found the second part of the video particularly interesting where they record a track with live effects.

iELECTRIBE remains at the introductory price of just $9.99 (£5.99) until the end of June and, as we said in our original post, at that price it is a bargain, grab it now!

 

Making Music with the iPad - Loopers, Synths and (Drum)Pads - Part 1

Without being able to play an actual instrument, such as Piano or Keyboards, Guitar or Drums, there are still many ways to make music electronically, and the iPad as a platform for unleashing this creativity is no exception.  There are new music creation apps being added for the iPad nearly every day, as well as those already existing for the iPhone and iPod Touch.

In this mini-series of posts we will take a look at a few of the main non-Keyboard Synths, Loop and Drum Pad apps that have caught our attention and, importantly, have been written especially for the iPad or have their own re-worked version for the iPad.

First up, a very faithful simulation of an awesome piece of beatmaker hardware:

KORG iELECTRIBEGorgeous to look at and very detailed in its execution, Korg's digital recreation of its own classic hardware the ELECTRIBE•R also includes a few features from some of the more advanced Korg beatmakers the ELECTRIBE•SX and ELECTRIBE•MX, and even the inclusion of the Vacuum Tube animation in the window at the top, the Tubes  react as the real ones would, a really nice UI touch.

Korg calls this app a 'virtual analog beatbox' and they say that while it is fun to use it 'is no toy'.  Everything has been brought over from the ELECTRIBE•R, the 'entire sound engine and sequencer' and nearly all the functionality you would expect is present here, including features such as:

  • 16 step sequencer
  • Four part percussion synthesizer (enhanced by cross modulation)
  • Four part PCM synthesizer
  • Accent function
  • Virtual Valve Force Tube modelling (for that analogue warmth, controlled by a Tube Gain knob)
  • 64 pattern presets get started straight away with these presets covering those on the ELECTRIBE•R plus new ones created especially for iELECTRIBE
  • 8 master effect types some brought over from the SX/MX hardware including the super-grungy Decimator, nice!
  • Advanced Motion Sequencing: allows live 'tweaking' to be memorised and replayed in your sequence. This improves on the original hardware which was limited in the number of parts it could memorise and incorporate into the sequence, but the iPad app has no limitation, Korg claims it can memorise 'all the parameters for each and every part', allowing some pretty complex patterns to be created.

Sequences you create can be saved in the app, called up later and amended or enhanced, but unfortunately there is no export option at the moment for DAW sync, which means that your creations stay on the iPad and cannot be incorporated into your desktop based music software, at the moment.  This may be added, but there is no word on that happening just yet from Korg, although a lot of the iTunes reviews and Korg forum posts are asking for this functionality.

Overall though this app is amazing value for money when you think about what is included here.  We have no doubt that, with a certain amount of skill and practice, this app could be used for a live performance, and with the portability of the iPad this could take your performances places the more bulky real life hardware couldn't.  Plus you can check your e-mail, browse the web, and show off your photos on the same device, try doing that with your hardware beatmaker!

iECLECTRIBE will normally be $19.99, but until 30th June Korg are selling it for $9.99 (just £5.99) and we think this is a great price for what is 'virtually' an excellent recreation of a couple of hundred dollars worth of hardware.  Have a look at the videos below and check it out in the app store if it pushes your buttons.

An in-depth look at the app compared to the real hardware

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