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Entries in Artist (14)

Cosmic Procreate iPad Painting by John Seru

Cosmic from john seru on Vimeo.

We like the way this timelapse video starts with a paper sketch of John Seru's Astronaut. His Procreate iPad painting is all the more interesting if you watch to the end and see what the Astronaut has seen in his visor.

Video: 'Reignite' Procreate iPad Painting by James Julier

Here's a nice warming iPad painting for those of us in the grip of Winter.  Painted by James Julier in Procreate for iPad, it is an interesting look at the creative process of someone who admits they are still learning how to get the best from this great iPad app.

See more iPad art created in Procreate

"Happy Ogre" by Andy Ellis in Procreate

Andy Ellis is an Illustrator who loves using Procreate to capture ideas and pre-production sketches on his iPad. Andy recently posted a review of Procreate on his blog telling us why he prefers using it over other apps, which is an interesting read.

The video above is one of Andy’s recent illustration sketches but to see more of his work be sure to visit his portfolio site too.

Video: Fantasy Speed Painting with Procreate

It is always fascinating for us to view and examine the creative process and how others use apps like Procreate on their iPads. With that in mind, we enjoyed this video by Danny Glasgow, we hope you do too.

iPad Art: Treasure Trove by Dan Hoffman

Dip into our iPad Creative Flickr Group on any given day and you will find many examples of paintings, sketches, photographs and even some animations that have been created or edited with an iPad.

The painting below from Dan Hoffman was made with the stunning Procreate app. We loved the colour, light and style of Treasure Trove, it really stood out to us, we hope you like it too. Be sure to check out Dan's other paintings on his Flickr stream.

Treasure Trove

Sensu Brush Review - Was it Worth the Wait?

Sensu- Artist Brush for iPad from Artist Hardware on Vimeo.

It took 6 months from the close of their successful Kickstarter campaign (it felt like a lot longer somehow), but the team at Artist Hardware finally started sending out the first Sensu brush production units earlier this month to their patiently waiting backers, including us.

So, was it worth the wait?

Oh yes - we have a new love in our lives!

Industrial design

The Sensu has been designed as both a stylus and an artist brush for your iPad (and other capacitive screen devices).

It performs this dual function using a very carefully thought out design that incorporates the brush handle as a protective cap when in 'stylus mode' and it works really well.

Sensu brush stages - Image courtesy of sensubrush.com

As a Stylus

When the Sensu arrives (complete with a nice little felt slip case for Kickstarter backers) it is in stylus mode (top of the picture above). We were really impressed by the way the Sensu Brush works as a stylus or pointing device.

How it feels

The chrome-plated brass body feels light but stable in hand. The length of the stylus means it fits perfectly in the crook of our hands between thumb and index finger when used in pen/pointer mode. The smooth sculpted shape of the stylus body/brush cover is simply lovely. 

We felt it was one of the most natural and balanced styli we have used. It seems just about perfect for long sessions writing, sketching, or painting. Of course, everyone's hands are different, but we think the Sensu is spot-on as a stylus.

Sensu brush stylus - Image courtesy of sensubrush.com

Stylus tip

Artist Hardware have gone for the soft, malleable rubber 'ball' approach that many other stylus makers have used, which does seem to best emulate a human digit. The construction is solid though and we had no worries about possibly tearing the material or mushing it out of shape like some of the cheaper styli we have tested.

As with many new styli, it takes a short while to get used to the amount of pressure needed, but once you have worked it out you don't think about it again.

As a Brush

It is when it is in brush mode, though, that the Sensu really shines. Slip the protective cap away from the stylus tip and you reveal the brush, cosseted inside.

Flipping the cap round and putting it back on over the stylus tip creates a handle for the Sensu Brush which is only a little shorter than the handle found on another favourite of ours from last year, the Nomad Brush.

Sensu in Brush mode - Image courtesy of sensubrush.com

Again, the team at Artist Hardware have thought very carefully about the design here and we don't have any complaints about the balance or feel of the brush in use. As with the stylus mode, the brush sits nicely in the crook of our hand and, with fingers on the rubberised barrel grip, feels perfectly natural to use. 

Similar to the Nomad Brush but with a more tightly bunched cluster, the hairs of the brush are synthetic, conductive, fibres.

In use, the brush felt very responsive and tracked precisely across the iPad's screen. Like the Nomad Brush, it is possible to use the brush as a pointing device on the iPad screen if you really wanted to (though it is not always as accurate or reliable as your finger would be for these tasks).

You can see Matt Lynaugh from Artist Hardware doing just this in his video below, where he demonstrates using the Sensu to paint a portrait in ArtRage on his iPad. It is well worth a watch if you're keen to see the Sensu brush in action.

Painting a Portrait with the Sensu brush and Artrage from Artist Hardware on Vimeo.

Tried, tested, loved!

We tried the brush with ArtRage, procreate, Inspire Pro, SketchBook Pro, Paper, and the stylus with Penultimate, Notability, Skitch, Bamboo Paper, even (perhaps especially) Draw Something, as well as other apps that we had sat on our iPads. The Sensu worked faultlessly with all of them.

But we're not the only ones who have been using the Sensu, check out some of the images below from Matt Lynaugh (the first one being the end result of his video above) plus a few other Sensu users who have shared their work:

Sam-3.17.12 © Matt Lynaugh

Assorted Veggies © Matt LynaughImage © Raul Allen

Image © Margi Laurin

Final Thoughts

Whilst individual user style and personal preference always come into play with devices like the Sensu, we have to say we have loved using the Sensu Brush. In fact, it is now a permanent companion to our iPad and taken everywhere with it.

The iPad Creative kids (ages 6 and 4) took to the Sensu with total ease as well and began painting with the brush immediately after it was unwrapped. In fact, for a while, it was a struggle to get it off of them.

If you are looking for a great stylus or brush for your iPad, but especially if you are looking for both, our recommendation is that you order the Sensu as soon as it becomes available.

We got our Sensu by backing the Kickstarter project and we are very happy we did.

Sensu will be available for purchase in May 2012 from sensubrush.com at a price of $39.99.

New Kickstarter: The Twitter Art Project

Create one piece of original art (mostly on an iPad) and upload it to Twitter each and every day.

That's the challenge that freelance illustrator and designer Chris Bigelow set himself. His (mostly) colourful, vibrant art has an energetic, sometimes frenetic, style we really like, see the video above for some examples.

We only wish we had known about this project sooner. Check out his site for more recent samples of Chris' work.

Taking suggestions and input from his followers, Chris (a.k.a. ArtanonDesign on Twitter) has been doing this for just over a year now and as he moves into another year he wants to expand the project, widen the audience, get other artists involved and build a community around the project.

Back the Project

To do this, Chris has started a Kickstarter project to raise promotional funds and to build a website (currently limited to a holding page) around the art project. He is looking for just $1000.

To help Chris out you can pledge various amounts, starting from just $1. $5, for example, will get your name (or screen name) incorporated into one of the daily images, $10 for your suggestion or theme to be incorporated into one of the project images.

The top funding level of $1000 will secure your spot as a sponsor for a month of the project, a signed one-off print of your choosing and knowledge that you are the most generous 'supporter of the arts' (our words not Chris').

Get on over to Kickstarter and show your support for Chris and his Twitter Art Project if you can. He has just 19 days left to make his target and he is a fifth of the way there so far, so he needs your help.

We look forward to seeing more of Chris' artwork and we'll be following his twitter stream from now on to see his daily postings.

iPad Art: Decomissioning of the Gigabot by Matthew Watkins

Here's a superb iPad painting from Matthew Watkins that he recently added to our iPad Creative Flickr Group.

Decommissioning Of The Gigabot

We love the final result with its futuristic styling, but we especially appreciate Matthew posting the Brushes video on Flickr too.

Unfortunately, Flickr video embeds still rely on the Flash player so we can't show it to you here, but you can watch the full Brushes video in Matthew's Flickr stream.

While you're there check out the rest of Matthew's iPad art, it is very impressive body of work.

Inside the creative process

We've said this before, but we are always fascinated to see the artist's creative process in action.

That's why we really love that the Brushes app enables the recording and exporting of these movies.

Our thanks again to Matthew for sharing this video and painting with the group.

Live iPad Drawing by Jenny Soep

The video above is a short sample from Jenny Soep, 'documentary artist and illustrator'.

Jenny has made a name for herself in the art/live performance world for her fluid and dynamic style in capturing live music and performances. She has also been artist-in-residence at several events and festivals, as well as her artwork being used in promotional materials and publications.

Enter the iPad

We took an interest in Jenny's work because, more recently, she has been using an iPad to record some of her drawings (using the Brushes app) as in the video above.

Even more interesting is Jenny's brave move to use the iPad's display out mode and project on a large screen her drawing as she does it, live in front of the gathered audience.

We think this gives Jenny's work a unique energy as she reacts to the music, atmosphere and audience around her. It also serves to inform the audience about the creative process as it happens.

Jenny In Action

Below is a video of Jenny in action using the (new to us) app Paint Sapien on her iPad. The video was taken by the app developer Dave Sapien at one of Jenny's exhibitions.

Free PDF of iPad and other Digital Art from Starr Allen Shaw

Starr Shaw Book Cover

Although not entirely iPad focussed, we enjoyed browsing through this free PDF portfolio from Digital Artist Starr Allen Shaw.

His Cyber Girl iPad painting (video below) was one of the earlier art pieces we covered that used the Brushes recording mode to show how the painting was created.

This is what Starr says about using the iPad as a creative tool:

"The iPad, Magical, Yes!  After work its hard to get motivated to do anything creative.  The iPad helps this by being so lightweight, and instantly turns on with tons of creative apps for Painting, Drawing, Sculpting, and Music!"

You can download a copy of the free PDF for yourself and view it in iBooks (other PDF readers are available) from the website.

There is some (mostly 3D modelled) nudity so maybe not one for the kids.